2004/08/22

Gaudi

Gaudi started the construction of his cathedral in Barcelona in 1883. He died in 1926 and his cathedral was only 15% completed. Work restarted in 1952 and today the cathedral is 40% completed.
"""The Junta Constructora del Templo, which oversees the project, optimistically predicts that it will be done in 30 years.
Toni Meca, 41, a Barcelona advertising executive and film producer, was not willing to wait. "I wanted to finish the cathedral virtually because I knew it would be the only way for many people to see it completed," he said in a recent interview here. "It is the most important building in the world. Even a child can respond to it because Gaudí based his designs almost solely on forms found in nature."""




Cathedral today

Cathedral terminated

2004/08/20

Acrylics: On my way of painting

The next images are about my 2004 production, a collection of 31 acrylics.
(size 17 x 22" = 43 x 56 cm)

Paintings are subjective renderings of the creator's feelings and ideas but we often forget that viewing a painting is as much subjective as the act of making it.
In order to let the viewer have a more objective approach, I give here a detailed textual description of my way of painting.

Modern art 25


POST PSYCHEDELIC PRINT COLLECTION
1-04-01 (1/25 limited edition)
ROADS TO MODERNISM 01


2004/08/19

Modern art 24.


POST PSYCHEDELIC PRINT COLLECTION
1-02-06 (1/25 limited edition)
Mystic fish 06

2004/08/18

Modern art 23.


POST PSYCHEDELIC PRINT COLLECTION
1-05-04 (1/25 limited edition)
Mindscape 04


2004/08/17

Modern art 22


POST PSYCHEDELIC PRINT COLLECTION
1-05-12 (1/25 limited edition)
Mindscape 12

2004/08/16

Modern art 21


POST PSYCHEDELIC PRINT COLLECTION
1-05-02 (1/25 limited edtion)
Mindscape 02


2004/08/14

Modern art 20


POST PSYCHEDELIC PRINT COLLECTION
1-01-09 (1/25 limited edition)
Tree of life 09


The Fractal Art Manifesto by Kerry Mitchell in Fractalus

"""As a genre, Fractal Art (FA) has been around for approximately 15-20 years. Its first major public display may be considered to be an article about the Mandelbrot Set published in "Scientific American" in 1985. Since then, many advances have been made, both in fractal rendering capabilities and in the understanding of fractal geometery. Perhaps now is an opportune time to make a defining statement about what is (and what is not) Fractal Art.
Fractal Art is a genre concerned with fractals—shapes or sets characterized by self affinity (small portions of the image resemble the overall shape) and an infinite amount of detail, at all scales. Fractals are typically created on a digital computer, using an iterative numerical process. Lately, images that are not technically fractals, but that share the same basic generating technique and environment, have been welcomed into the FA world.
Fractal Art is a subclass of two dimensional visual art, and is in many respects similar to photography—another art form which was greeted by skepticism upon its arrival. Fractal images typically are manifested as prints, bringing Fractal Artists into the company of painters, photographers, and printmakers. Fractals exist natively as electronic images. This is a format that traditional visual artists are quickly embracing, bringing them into FA's digital realm.
Generating fractals can be an artistic endeavor, a mathematical pursuit, or just a soothing diversion. However, FA is clearly distinguished from other digital activities by what it is, and by what it is not.

Fractal Art is not:

Computer(ized) Art, in the sense that the computer does all the work. The work is executed on a computer, but only at the direction of the artist. Turn a computer on and leave it alone for an hour. When you come back, no art will have been generated.
Random, in the sense of stochastic, or lacking any rules. Being based on mathematics, fractal rendering is the essence of determinism. Apply the same image generation steps, and the same result will follow. Slight changes in process usually lead to slight changes in product, making FA an activity which can be learned, not a haphazard process of pushing buttons and turning knobs.
Random, in the sense of unpredictable. Fractal Art, like any new pursuit, will have aspects unknown to the novice, but familiar to the master. Through experience and education, the techniques of FA can be learned. As in painting or chess, the essentials are quickly grasped, although they can take a lifetime to fully understand and control. Over time, the joy of serendipitous discovery is replaced by the joy of self-determined creation.
Something that anyone with a computer can do well. Anyone can pick up a camera and take a snapshot. However, not just anyone can be an Ansel Adams or an Annie Liebovitz. Anyone can take brush in hand and paint. However, not just anyone can be a Georgia O'Keeffe or a Pablo Picasso. Indeed, anyone with a computer can create fractal images, but not just anyone will excel at creating Fractal Art.

Fractal Art is:

Expressive. Through a painter's colors, a photographer's use of light and shadow, or a dancer's movements, artists learn to express and evoke all manner of ideas and emotions. Fractal Artists are no less capable of using their medium as a similarly expressive language, as they are equipped with all the essential tools of the traditional visual artist.
Creative. The final fractal image must be created, just as the photograph or the painting. It can be created as a representational work, and abstraction of the basic fractal form, or as a nonrepresentational piece. The Fractal Artist begins with a blank "canvas", and creates an image, bringing together the same basic elements of color, composition, balance, etc., used by the traditional visual artist.
Requiring of input, effort, and intelligence. The Fractal Artist must direct the assembly of the calculation formulas, mappings, coloring schemes, palettes, and their requisite parameters. Each and every element can and will be tweaked, adjusted, aligned, and re-tweaked in the effort to find the right combination. The freedom to manipulate all these facets of a fractal image brings with it the obligation to understand their use and their effects. This understanding requires intelligence and thoughtfulness from the Artist.

Most of all, Fractal Art is simply that which is created by Fractal Artists: ART. """

2004/08/13

Modern art 19


POST PSYCHEDELIC PRINT COLLECTION
1-03-11 (1/25 limited edition)
Explosion of colors 11



About fractals.
Fractals are images generated by mathematical formulas that can be downloaded from public formulas databases on the internet. After launching a formula in a fractal program, an image results that can be modified in basically 2 ways:
1. tweaking the formula + the
coloring algorithm + the transformation formula.
2. Zooming into the image. In the words of Fractalus, "a fractal is a shape that, when you look at a small part of it, has a similar (but not necessarily identical) appearance to the full shape. Take, for example, a rocky mountain. From a distance, you can see how rocky it is; up close, the surface is very similar. Little rocks have a similar bumpy surface to big rocks and to the overall mountain". Fractal programs let you zoom in the image as many times as you want, every time one step deeper.
You can then tweak the parameters of this new image and zoom into it until you find a selection that is visually attractive for you.
The best of programs let you cut out from the image the part that you wish to retain instead of having to rework the whole displayed image.

Are fractals art works?

Again I'll refer to Fractalus:
"What seems so plain to fractal enthusiasts—that fractals are a form of art—doesn't appear to be quite so obvious to other people. The assumption seems to be that since fractals can't really be produced without software, which does all the calculations, that the "artist" must just be punching in some random numbers and seeing what results. This couldn't possibly be art.

Well, it just doesn't work like that. It really isn't that simple. Yes, anybody can download some fractal software, play with it for a few minutes, and produce a picture or two. But then, anyone can buy Photoshop, play with it for a few minutes, and produce a picture, too; is that art? What about if someone buys a canvas, some paints and brushes, and whips out some simple painting? Is that art? Does it matter what tools are used? "

2004/08/12

Modern art 18


POST PSYCHEDELIC PRINT COLLECTION
1-02-12 (1/25 limited edition)
Mystic fish 12



It is an unquestionable fact that Prints fade. Two factors explain this:
- paper quality and longevity
- Ink quality and longevity

Wilhelm Imaging Research, Inc is the world leading specialist of those matters relating to prints durability.

Eina BEMS, the company distributing my prints, uses one of the best combinations presently available on the market for its art prints:

1. EPSON Enhanced Archival Matte paper: a beautiful flat finished heavyweight paper, with no texture surface; popular for fine art use
- Features:
* Flat matte surface
* Instant drying with Epson inks
* Excellent color reproduction
* Highest resolution output
* Photo thickness
* Excellent Hightlights
* Fine shadow detail
- Detailed Specs:
* Weight: 45 lb. (192 g/m2)
* Thickness: 10.3 mil
* Opacity: 94%
* Pounds/Ream 51#
* Base Material: Paper
* Surface: Flat Matte
* Lightfastness: 62 years.

These ratings are based on accelerated testings of prints on specialty media displayed indoors, under glass. Actual print stability will vary according to media, printed image, display conditions, light intensity and atmospheric conditions. For maximum print life display, place all prints under glass or lamination or properly store them. Ratings based on tests conducted by Epson and Wilhelm Imaging Research Inc.
For more about the subject, visit Inkjet Art Solutions

2. EPSON UltraChrome inks.
Pigment-based, the ink is water-resistant, resists running or smudging, with any paper type, though the papers may not be waterfast. These inks resist fading from light in framed display condition for over 60 years. These ratings are based on tests conducted by Epson and Wilhelm Imaging Research. PC World cites a Display Permanence rating of 92 years for the EPSON C80-82 inks as used by Eina BEMS for printing its 8x10' formats.

2004/08/11

Modern art 17


POST PSYCHEDELIC PRINT COLLECTION
1-02-08 (1/25 limited edition)
Mystic fish 08


My "Post-Psychedelic Print Collection", to this day, comprises 60 "digital paintings" that I created in 2002. I plan to give in this blog's "Modern art" series a selection of 8 of those prints as an illustration of my digital work.

Those works are realized with the following FREE programs:

- Fractals: I used successively the following tools: Fractint, Chaos Pro and Ultra Fractal. All 3 programs can be downloaded free. Ultra Fractal is clearly my preferred. You can for example cut parts of a fractal image and then zoom in those parts... After reaching an interesting fractal image, I transfer this image to an imaging program for changing contrast, intensity, colors and details.

- Imaging: Adobe photoshop7 and The Gimp. I worked with Photoshop since the mid-nineties but after working extensively with The Gimp recently, I find that the Gimp works perfectly for me. Technically, you get the same functions on both programs, the real bonus of The Gimp is that it is Free while Photoshop costs hundreds of $ that you have to give out with each new version. The finalized image has then to be transferred to an editing program for printing.

- Editing and printing: I now use Open Office for A4 (letter) or A3 sizes (a free program that I find very stable and user friendly). I used to work with Page Maker which I continue to use for larger sizes. I discovered Scribus (free) recently, critics say that it is comparable to Page Maker but I need more time to familiarize with this program.

2004/08/10

Modern art 16


DREAMSCAPE. Tapestry n# A-001-4x6'-1/1
(photo of a 1 Design Unit = 120 x 180 cm)
Artist unique edition tapestry: 1 on 1 piece in total, available in
2 different sizes (1, 4 design units)
Here follows the design of a 4 Design Units

Tapestry n# A-001-x4psd.jpg-1/1


I have been commissionned in 2002 to design a collection of tapestries for Eina BEMS llc.

Traditional tapestries and rugs are based on the weaving of yarns. Eina BEMS' material as well as the manufacturing technique were new (assembly
of leather-wool parts) and nobody had ever designed rugs for this technique.

Eina BEMS' finally selected 13 designs, in 2 color versions, among some hundred designs that I had proposed. In total that gave them a collection of 26 different tapestries.

I give here a sampling of 7 of those tapestries as illustration of my designs. For more on those tapestries, visit www.einabems.com

2004/08/08

Modern art 15


THE INFINITE A. Tapestry n# D-014-A-S-1DU-../30
(photo of a 1 Design Unit = 120 x 180 cm)
Limited edition tapestry: 1 on 30 pieces in total, available in
6 different sizes (1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 design units)
Here follows the design of a 8 Design Unit

Tapestry n# D-005-A-S-8DU-../30


I have been commissionned in 2002 to design a collection of tapestries for Eina BEMS llc.

Traditional tapestries and rugs are based on the weaving of yarns. Eina BEMS' material as well as the manufacturing technique were new (assembly
of leather-wool parts) and nobody had ever designed rugs for this technique.

Eina BEMS' finally selected 13 designs, in 2 color versions, among some hundred designs that I had proposed. In total that gave them a collection of 26 different tapestries.

I give here a sampling of 7 of those tapestries as illustration of my designs. For more on those tapestries, visit www.einabems.com

2004/08/07

Modern art 14


SONG OF SPRING A. Tapestry n# D-013-A-S-1DU-../30
(photo of a 1 Design Unit= 120 x 180 cm)
Limited edition tapestry: 1 on 30 pieces in total, available in
6 different sizes (1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 design units)
Here follows the design of a 8 Design Unit

Tapestry n# D-005-A-S-8DU-../30


I have been commissionned in 2002 to design a collection of tapestries for Eina BEMS llc.

Traditional tapestries and rugs are based on the weaving of yarns. Eina BEMS' material as well as the manufacturing technique were new (assembly
of leather-wool parts) and nobody had ever designed rugs for this technique.

Eina BEMS' finally selected 13 designs, in 2 color versions, among some hundred designs that I had proposed. In total that gave them a collection of 26 different tapestries.

I give here a sampling of 7 of those tapestries as illustration of my designs. For more on those tapestries, visit www.einabems.com

2004/08/06

Modern art 13


WINNOW THE WINGS A. Tapestry n# D-007-A-S&L-1DU-../30
(photo of a 1 Design Unit = 120 x 180 cm)
Limited edition tapestry: 1 on 30 pieces in total, available in
6 different sizes (1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 design units)
Here follows the design of a 8 Design Unit

Tapestry n# D-005-A-S-8DU-../30


I have been commissionned in 2002 to design a collection of tapestries for Eina BEMS llc.

Traditional tapestries and rugs are based on the weaving of yarns. Eina BEMS' material as well as the manufacturing technique were new (assembly
of leather-wool parts) and nobody had ever designed rugs for this technique.

Eina BEMS' finally selected 13 designs, in 2 color versions, among some hundred designs that I had proposed. In total that gave them a collection of 26 different tapestries.

I give here a sampling of 7 of those tapestries as illustration of my designs. For more on those tapestries, visit www.einabems.com

2004/08/05

Modern art 12


MIRROR A. Tapestry n# D-007-A-S&L-1DU-../30
(photo of a 1 Design Unit = 120 x 180 cm)
Limited edition tapestry: 1 on 30 pieces in total, available in
6 different sizes (1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 design units)
Here follows the design of a 8 Design Unit

Tapestry n# D-005-A-S-8DU-../30


I have been commissionned in 2002 to design a collection of tapestries for Eina BEMS llc.

Traditional tapestries and rugs are based on the weaving of yarns. Eina BEMS' material as well as the manufacturing technique were new (assembly
of leather-wool parts) and nobody had ever designed rugs for this technique.

Eina BEMS' finally selected 13 designs, in 2 color versions, among some hundred designs that I had proposed. In total that gave them a collection of 26 different tapestries.

I give here a sampling of 7 of those tapestries as illustration of my designs. For more on those tapestries, visit www.einabems.com

2004/08/04

Modern art 11


FLAMING A. Tapestry n# D-005-A-S-1DU-../30
(photo of a 1 Design Unit = 120 x 180 cm)
Limited edition tapestry: 1 on 30 pieces in total, available in
6 different sizes (1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 design units)
Here follows the design of a 8 Design Unit

Tapestry n# D-005-A-S-8DU-../30


I have been commissionned in 2002 to design a collection of tapestries for Eina BEMS llc.

Traditional tapestries and rugs are based on the weaving of yarns. Eina BEMS' material as well as the manufacturing technique were new (assembly
of leather-wool parts) and nobody had ever designed rugs for this technique.

Eina BEMS' finally selected 13 designs, in 2 color versions, among some hundred designs that I had proposed. In total that gave them a collection of 26 different tapestries.

I give here a sampling of 7 of those tapestries as illustration of my designs. For more on those tapestries, visit www.einabems.com

2004/08/03

Modern art 10



Philosophy. Beijing. Fall 2001
Gouache/paper 55 x 80 cm.




CONTENT


An image, colors and words.
The words in the image are the following:

The contact between opposites generates a burst of energy fueling changes and transformations that are as the seconds on the ticking clock of evolution.

From this we know that the life of all species and their members is given by the changes occuring in the following 3 dimensions:

- The SKY or the influences of environments, from vicinity to infinity, on each specy and its members.

- The EARTH or the influences of the hardware and software assigned to the members of each living specy. This is called:
* the drama of reproduction of the specy through sex
* the drama of reproduction of the individuals through the satisfaction of their objective needs: food and shelter.

- The SELF or the influences of the cultural and economic works of each specy upon itself, upon its members, upon other species and upon the environment.
Seeing that cultural and economic works are nothing more than the specific forms and answers of one particular specy to the influences of the earth and the sky, that is very wise indeed.

Since having written this text in fall of 2001, I come to think that I should add a third aspect of the earthly influences:
* the drama of complexification: starting with unicellular organisms, life is programmed to strive for always higher degrees of complexity.

2004/08/02

Modern art 9


The Concert hall that Beijing will not get. Beijing. Fall 2001
Gouache/paper 55 x 65 cm.

CONTENT

Having decided to build a new concert hall in the capital Beijing, in 2000, the Chinese Government called for bids from architects and designers. They received proposals from around the world and after long deliberations, the selection committee decided to award the contract to Paul Andreau, the French architect who had built Shanghai's International airport. His project was to build a half sphere, covered with titanium plates, wherein the different concert rooms would be encased.

A storm of protests erupted from the Chinese architect community and the project was cancelled.

After many months of silence, the selection committee decided to reaward the contract to the French architect. JIANG Jemin's voice triumphed, Beijing would have its modernist monument.

Witness of all this affair, I put my own idea on paper...

The most amazing came after Paul Andreu's Paris new terminal at Charles de Gaulle crashed unexpectedly only 6 months
after its opening. Beijing was sweating, the talk was now all about the calculations of the construction that they had started under Andreu's direction?

But more importantly, how shall their leaders' monument to modernity reflect upon
Beijingers and all chinese for that matter? Let's just for an instant imagine what has been Beijing's masters deep motive. Is it proudness of their culture and civilization or is it some sort of deeply burried shame that makes them reject all Chineseness and root for a deeply Western take on modernity?
In the end, should Andreu's selection not be seen as something akin to Jiang jemin dyeing his hair in yellow


The New York Times, of August 1st 2004, had an article by SAMUEL G. FREEDMAN entitled Frank Gehry's Mideast Peace Plan. It seems that Gehry's take on modernity succeeded where all the world is failing since years. Israelis and Palestinians at the end can agree on something: they hate Gehry's Simon Wiesenthal Museum of Tolerance. They hate this Western cubist cliche of modernity.
Could we one day see the Chinese united in hating Andreu's vision and toring his monument down?

2004/08/01

Modern art 8


Vegetable garden. Beijing. Fall 2001
Gouache on paper. 55 x 80 cm.

CONTENT

In the Western world and the big cities of the developing world, people nowadays eat stuff coming out of tin cans, plastic bags of frozen food and other plastic bags of junk that have been produced in huge agribusiness factories controled by a handfull of multinational corporations. In our area of hyper-industrialism food mutated into an industrial merchandise.

Statistics show us that these last 50 years more and more of us are fattening, they call that rampant obesity. What they don't tell is that such obesity is a direct consequence of daily ingestion of industrial foods. Take a look at the ingredients content that I found on the package of bread and cookies: niacin, thiamin mononitrate, riboflavfin, folic acid, monocalcium phosphate, calcium sulfate, ammonium chloride, erythorbic acid, L-cysteine, ascorbic acid, azodicarbonamide, calcium propionate.

As I see it, obesity is as a collective punishment for the growing distance between ourselves and the origin of what we eat.

Vegetable garden is about my memory of the beauty of gardening when health and beauty were doing fine before the agribusiness fell into the claws of big capital.